Real Estate Law in Arkansas

Real estate law in Alma covers almost everything involved in the sale and use of land.

The law governing real estate in Alma can get pretty complicated, especially when things such as mortgages, disputes about construction defects, and conflicts over title are involved.

Accordingly, it's a good idea to learn some of the basics of Alma's real estate laws.

Having at least some knowledge of real estate law will be to your advantage in virtually any real estate transaction. Knowing the law can give you a bargaining advantage and prevent you from being saddled with obligations that you don't have to assume.

Common Real Estate Law Issues in Alma

Financing: Most individuals, families, and small businesses in Alma cannot afford to buy a large piece of real estate with the money they have on hand. However, they often can afford to pay for it over a long period of time, in installments, with interest. Thus, most real estate is purchased using a mortgage - a loan for a specific purchase, using the item purchased as collateral.

Zoning: Zoning laws establish rules saying what kinds of buildings are authorized in various areas of a city or town. These rules serve a variety of purposes. For example, they normally protect residents by making it illegal for industrial facilities to be built in residential areas. This also protects industries, allowing them to do their business without being bothered by constant complaints and lawsuits from their residential neighbors.

Duty of Disclosure: Sellers of homes are bound by a legal duty to disclose defects in the home to prospective buyers, before they buy the house. Any defect which the seller knows (or reasonably should know) about, and which cannot be discovered by the buyer through an normal inspection, must be disclosed to the buyer.

Implied Warranties: In Alma, every residential rental agreement carries with it a warranty of habitability, in which the landlord implicitly promises that the unit is fit for human habitation. This applies whether or not such a warranty is stated in the lease agreement, and it still applies even if the landlord tries to disclaim any such warranty. There are many conditions that might make a unit uninhabitable. A few examples are a lack of electricity, no running water, or no heating.

Can a Alma Real Estate Lawyer Help?

These issues, along with many others, can sometimes be fairly convoluted. Therefore, you should never hesitate to consult with a Alma real estate attorney if you have any questions.