Real Estate Law in Texas

Atlanta's real estate industry is controlled by a huge body of laws. This is because almost any real estate transaction invokes laws regarding civil rights, consumer protection, land use, and contracts.

The numerous laws affecting real estate in Atlanta can sometimes feel overwhelming in their volume and complexity. This might apply doubly when your case involves a foreclosure, or a construction dispute.

Therefore, it's a smart idea to obtain at least a very basic knowledge of how real estate law in Atlanta works.

Knowing the law can serve you in a variety of ways: it can put you in a better negotiating position, it can help you spot unlawful terms in lease agreements, and confirm that you know your rights if a disagreement arises, among other things.

Common Real Estate Law Issues in Atlanta

Financing: Most individuals are unable to make major real estate purchases in Atlanta with cash, because few people have that kind of money on hand. Thus, to buy real estate, most entities use a mortgage. This is a loan used to buy a piece of property. When the loan is issued, and the property purchased, the lender holds a security interest in the property until the loan is paid off, with interest.

Zoning: Zoning regulations govern what types of structures are allowed on various parcels, based on their location in a municipality. For instance, some areas in a city might be zoned only for residential use. Another area might authorize industrial use. These rules are meant to keep property values up, and promote harmony among neighbors by preventing conflicts.

Duty to Disclose: sellers of real estate, particularly houses and other residential property, are legally bound to tell the buyer about any defects in the property that the seller knows about, and that the buyer couldn't easily discover on his own (mold or termite problems are frequent examples). If the seller fails to make such disclosures, he or she could be liable for any harm the defect causes to the buyer, as well as the cost of repairing it. If the seller intentionally conceals or lies about the defect, he or she might also face punitive damages.

Implied Warranties: Every lease of a residential unit in Atlanta carries with it an implicit promise by the owner that the unit will meet some basic minimum requirements for human habitability. There are many factors that go into deciding if an unit is "habitable," but there are a few essentials, and they include running water, heat, electricity, and adequate shelter from the elements.

Can a Atlanta Real Estate Lawyer Help?

The issues briefly discussed above, as well as many others, can be very difficult. Accordingly, if you are engaged in any real estate transaction, it's never a bad idea to first consult with an experienced Atlanta real estate attorney.