Real Estate Law in Illinois

Real estate law in Maryville governs almost everything involved in the sale and use of land.

The massive volume of laws governing real estate in Maryville might seem overwhelming to the uninitiated. Indeed, they can get very complicated, especially when issues about title defects or construction disputes are involved.

Accordingly, it's a good idea to learn some of the basics of Maryville's real estate laws.

Some understanding of the relevant law can give you an advantage in almost any situation. In the real estate context, it can help you spot illegal terms in lease agreements, give you some idea of what your rights are in a dispute, among other things. If nothing else, knowledge of the law can help you spot people who are willing to break it, so you can avoid dealing with them.

Common Real Estate Law Issues in Maryville

Financing: Not too many people or small businesses in Maryville can purchase real estate with the cash on hand, simply because land is expensive, and few people have hundreds of thousands (or even millions) of dollars in the bank. In buying real estate, a mortgage is an excellent solution for most people. Of course, you still have to pay the full price of the real estate you're buying, but a mortgage allows you to do this in installments, over a period of years.

Zoning: Zoning regulations determine what types of structures are allowed on various parcels, based on their location in a municipality. For example, some areas in a city might be zoned only for residential use. Another area might allow industrial use. These rules are meant to keep property values up, and promote harmony among neighbors by preventing conflicts.

Duty of Disclosure: Sellers of homes are bound by a legal duty to disclose defects in the home to prospective buyers, before they buy the house. Any defect which the seller knows (or reasonably should know) about, and which cannot be discovered by the buyer through an ordinary inspection, must be disclosed to the buyer.

Implied Warranties: In Maryville, every residential lease agreement, whether it's explicitly stated or not, has an "implied warranty of habitability." This is a legally-imposed promise by the landlord that the rented dwelling (whether it's a house or apartment) is fit for habitation by humans. While there are many requirements for a place to be considered habitable, some of the most important ones are electricity, running water, heating, and protection from the elements.

Can a Maryville Real Estate Lawyer Help?

These issues, along with many others, can sometimes be fairly complicated. Therefore, you should never hesitate to consult with a Maryville real estate attorney if you have any questions.